Tiananmen’s 25th anniversary vigil in Hong Kong

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Viola Zhou

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Zuma

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hanging with a hung

15 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong // +852 3657 6388

http://www.zumarestaurant.com/zuma-landing/hong-kong/en/welcome

Zuma is one of my favourite restaurants in Hong Kong. The reason – their brunches are to die for, first of all you get unlimited champagne (and other drinks) AND you get to stuff your face with unlimited high quality Japanese food. What else would a nineteen year old want?

Every time I come home, my mum and my sister and I will all traipse down to Zuma for a feast. Conversation is often limited as we are too busy stuffing our face and running back to the extensive (really really extensive) buffet selection.

Zuma’s decor is modern, simple and sophisticated. There is a grand sweeping spiralling glass staircase that lifts the environment from elegant glamour during the day to fancy bar at night. The furniture is spacious with tables made out of light wood that reflect the sun…

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Friday, May 2, 2014

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Voluntarily Lost: San Francisco to Hong Kong

I don’t know how I’m going to do it. I don’t even know if it’s possible in Asia. But as I feel the tightness around my waist when I’m trying to button up my jeans, I know I have to give it a shot. For two weeks, I’ll be going on a low-carb diet. I decided it last night after getting back to Hong Kong, feeling bloated and out of shape. Essentially for a whole month, I’ve been eating anything and everything in sight. Ever since Shane arrived, I’ve been focusing on making sure my friends get a tasty introducing to Hong Kong and Taipei – devouring rice dishes, noodle soups, fatty meats, dim sum, dumplings, steamed buns, fried snacks, cakes, pastries, desserts, etc. That of course continued with Arjun and even though I did a lot of walking with the two of them, I regularly skipped the gym because…

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今年盂蘭

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yaya chen 陳尹之

IMG_6421盂蘭節,也就是台灣所謂的中元節,英文翻譯為hungry ghost festival。

或許是因為華人民以食為天的性格,做鬼也不能餓到,農曆七月家家戶戶大方招待,想必孤魂野鬼可說是大飽口福。

香港農曆七月開始,街頭店家開始出現一些水果插上了香,而到西環一代海味街更有較『正式』的宴席。八點左右天色已全暗了,幾戶人家蹲在巷內路邊開始燒紙錢擺宴席,其中一家在地上排出了十組杯碗,點上幾柱香後一個年輕的女人蹲在碗陣之後,便拿隻湯匙將碗裡的水撈飯與豆腐、芽菜、酒一瓢一瓢的往地上潑洒。據說飯加了水,小鬼才有辦法吃。

當我們把畫面轉回台灣的中元節,家家戶戶把水果點心放在小桌上,前面擺上面盆與毛巾。假設我們想像『好兄弟』們將在家戶前洗面飲食。那麼在香港的好兄弟們是如何享用的呢?潑洒在馬路上,是怎麼享用呢?

而盂蘭節在香港最重要的當然是七月十五的神功戲,搭了戲台花牌在這彷彿忘記迷信的現代都會中,燒衣引起的濃煙則在城市裡暈染祭典的氳氤。

IMG_6700

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Google sued in Hong Kong in internet defamation case.

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Case Watch Asia

Albert Yeung
The Hong Kong High Court has given a prominent business man Albert Yeung Sau-shing leave to sue Google for defamation.

Yeung’s empire spans jewelry, property and finance in Hong Kong.

David Hanks
This Hong Kong case against Google comes at a time when a business man in Thailand, David Hanks, has filed criminal indictments against Google for a ‘disgusting’ post on Google’s ‘Blogger’ platform.

The case relates to searches for Yeung’s name on Google and suggestions made by the auto-complete function. In both Chinese and English versions auto-complete proposes the word ‘triad,’ a reference to Hong Kong organized crime syndicates, when searching for Yeung.

Yeung accuses Google of libel and is seeking to have it remove the organized crime references.

Google failed in a bid to have the case dismissed before it can go to trial.

The internet giant that the Hong Kong courts do not have the jurisdiction over…

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